Monthly Archives: February 2014

Back Cover Blurb for my Novel: What Do You Think?

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The Cathedral at Aachen

I’m deep into the process of having a cover done for my historical fiction novel Aachen, and I need a blurb. I would love to get your feedback!

Here’s the best blurb I’ve come up with so far:

The life of an 8th century peasant is,  as they say, “nasty, brutish, and short”.

Young Stephen of Orlans, though indentured and in poverty, has been raised from childhood to want something different. He longs to be a man of learning and dreams of studying at Charlemagne’s famed Palace School at Aachen.

After returning from a traumatic campaign, Stephen has the chance to attain his dream. But how can he take monastic vows when the sins of war have shattered his faith in God? And how can he leave Orlans when he is falling in love with a beautiful milkmaid with a scandalous reputation?

In the 8th century, scandal and betrayal are concealed by the thinnest of veils, and the path to reaching your dreams may be the most treacherous path of all. In his quest for redemption, Stephen will be forced to make decisions he will likely soon regret.

Decisions he will have to live with forever.

Stay tuned. I’ll be soon posting a poll on the top 5 designs from my book cover contest at 99designs.com!

Thanks for the feedback!

Science Gives Us a Little Way to Measure Holiness

Occasionally science gives us little glimpses of deeper truths that we normally wouldn’t associate with the scientfic method.

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A recent study of acts of selfless love shows that such acts – acts of self-sacrifice or charity with no expectations of reward – don’t bring us the same kind of pleasure that romantic love brings.

Romantic love tends to light up the same reward areas of the brain that are activated by cocaine. But new research shows that selfless love—a deep and genuine wish for the happiness of others—actually turns off the brain’s reward centers.

It isn’t news that the two types of love are different. We even have different words for them: agape for selfless love and eros for romantic love. We are all called to have agape for our fellow man, but we may or may not be called to eros for a spouse. And if that eros does not naturally transition to agape, we may find ourselves not feeling any kind of love for our spouse.

What is interesting here is not just that the two types of love bring about two different brain responses, but that acts of agape actually turn off the response centers that lead us to such great enjoyment of eros.

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So the holier we become, the less need we have of “the warm fuzzies” of your typical Hollywood romantic comedy. It’s almost as if the physiological response to passion, the triggering of those reward centers, is some kind of crutch, a crutch that teaches us to love in spite of ourselves. As we become more and more capable of selfless love, we use the crutch less and less until, finally, we can throw it away.

I still enjoy those puppy dog moments with my wife. Yes, we still have them. But I am even happier during those quiet moments where we sit together, not talking, just being. Those moments where we just simply fit together and everything seems right with the universe. Those are moments indeed when the Peace of the Lord is truly with us.

Violent Video Games Delay Development of Moral Judgement in Teens

If you needed more reasons to keep violent video games out of your home, here it is. New research shows a clear connection between playing violent video games and a lack of moral development in teens.

What struck me most about this particular article was not the confirmation of the obvious – that video games are bad for kids – but one throwaway comment by the author of the study.

Bajovic concedes that “prohibiting adolescents from playing violent video games is not realistic.”

The notion that it’s unrealistic for parents to prohibit destructive behavior in their teens is self-evident to a Science Daily journalist and accepted by a researcher in teen behavior. It’s a pretty common delusion. I know parents of 2nd graders who can’t say no when their kids ask for a smartphone. I have had other parents tell me to just send my kids to public school. You can’t keep them from being exposed to that stuff anyway, right?

It’s so wrong-headed it makes me want to hit my head against the wall. Our kids don’t have to play video games. They don’t have to be sexually active. They don’t have to try alcohol as a minor.

As parents, we must have a firm loving hand. We need to show strong moral leadership. We have to keep them away from bad influences and surround them with positive.

It’s a ton of work, it requires sacrifice, and there are no guarantees. Our children are humans with free will, after all. But that doesn’t mean it’s useless to try. Car seats and seat belts aren’t guaranteed either, but we’d never consider not using them.

Be strong and protect your kids while you can. They’ll enter the big bad world soon enough.